9/11 and the Literature of Terror

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Explores the fiction, poetry, theatre and cinema that have represented the 9/11 attacks. Works by Martin Amis, Ian McEwan, Don DeLillo, Simon Armitage and Mohsin Hamid are discussed in relation to the specific problems of writing about such a visually spectacular 'event' that has had enormous global implications. Other chapters analyse initial responses to 9/11, the intriguing tensions between fiction and non-fiction, the challenge of describing traumatic history and the ways in which the terrorist attacks have been discussed culturally in the decade since September 11. Key Features * Contributes to the growing literature on 9/11, presenting an over-view of some of the main texts that have represented the attacks and their aftermath * Focus on Don DeLillo: adds to the literature surrounding this major American novelist * Focus on Martin Amis: adds to the growing critical work on this much discussed British novelist and essayist * Man on Wire: provides a critical analysis of this Oscar winning film regarding its oblique references to 9/11 ...

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    Author: By (author)  Martin Randall
    Format: Hardback
    Language: English
    More Product Information 1: Flap copy
    AUTHOR APPROVED Explores the fiction, poetry, theatre and cinema that have represented the 9/11 attacks Works by Martin Amis, Ian McEwan, Don DeLillo, Simon Armitage and Mohsin Hamid are discussed in relation to the specific problems of writing about such a visually spectacular 'event' that has had enormous global implications.Other chapters analyse initial responses to 9/11, the intriguing tensions between fiction and non-fiction, the challenge of describing traumatic history and the ways in which the terrorist attacks have been discussed culturally in the decade since September 11. Key Features * Contributes to the growing literature on 9/11, presenting an over-view of some of the main texts that have represented the attacks and their after......

    More Product Information 2: Back cover copy
    AUTHOR APPROVED Explores the fiction, poetry, theatre and cinema that have represented the 9/11 attacks Works by Martin Amis, Ian McEwan, Don DeLillo, Simon Armitage and Mohsin Hamid are discussed in relation to the specific problems of writing about such a visually spectacular 'event' that has had enormous global implications.Other chapters analyse initial responses to 9/11, the intriguing tensions between fiction and non-fiction, the challenge of describing traumatic history and the ways in which the terrorist attacks have been discussed culturally in the decade since September 11. Key Features * Contributes to the growing literature on 9/11, presenting an over-view of some of the main texts that have represented the attacks and their after......

    More Product Information 3: Table of contents
    Acknowledgements; Introduction: 'Eyewitnesses, Conspiracies & Baudrillard'; 1. 'Beyond Belief': McEwan, DeLillo & 110 Stories; 2. 'Total Malignancy, Militant Irony': Martin Amis, The Second Plane; 3. 'You Know How It Ends': Metafiction & 9/11 in Windows on the World; 4. 'A Wing And A Prayer': Simon Armitage, Out of the Blue; 5. 'A Certain Blurring of the Facts': Man on Wire & 9/11; 6. 'He Is Consoling, She Is Distraught': Men & Women & 9/11 in The Mercy Seat & The Guys; 7. 'Everything Seemed To Mean Something': Signifying 9/11 in Don DeLillo's The Falling Man; Conclusion: 'I Am A Lover Of America'; Notes; Bibliography. ...

    More Product Information 4: About Martin Randall
    Martin Randall is a Senior Lecturer in Creative Writing at the University of Gloucestershire. His PhD concerned the representation of the Holocaust in contemporary British fiction. ...